Woorden tellen

December 8th, 2015 § 0 comments § permalink

Het is erg verleidelijk om woorden te gaan tellen in je eigen werk. De roman Tot Later telt 14311 verschillende woorden, of 118562 woorden in totaal, verdeeld over 7836 zinnen. Serendipiteit is nooit ver weg bij het schrijven, dus zie hier, de middelste zin van het boek luidt: “Poesjelief!” » Read the rest of this entry «

Counting words

December 8th, 2015 § 0 comments § permalink

While exploring NLTK or Natural Language Toolkit, I came across an interesting way of ‘reading’ The Book of Genesis.
This post is a small report. You find a a Dutch variant here. » Read the rest of this entry «

Schrijvers op het net

December 3rd, 2015 § 0 comments § permalink

Een overzicht van links naar interessante ‘algoliteraire creaties’ die gebruik maken van het internet.

Naar aanleiding van het programma in Passaporta: http://passaporta.be/agenda/schrijvers-op-het-net-ecrire-a-lere-dinternet

» Read the rest of this entry «

1984 revisited vandaag

April 4th, 2015 § 0 comments § permalink

Het project krijgt vandaag, op 4 april 2015, een nieuwe start!
Je kan het werkproces in het Nederlands volgen via https://gitlab.com/anamertens/1984_revisited

Met dank aan AM Heath and the Estate of the late Sonia Brownell Orwell & Arbeiderspers voor het gebruik van George Orwell’s 1984 voor datamining & datamatching.

“{KMI, weer op plaats van lezen} Het is overal zwaarbewolkt en ook plaatselijk nevelig. Op de meeste plaatsen valt er lichte regen of motregen. Wat lichte smeltende sneeuw in de Hoge Ardennen. De klokken slagen {tijd van schrijven} één uur éénentwintig. {meest voorkomende meisjesnaam plaats van lezen} Emma {meest voorkomende familienaam plaats van lezen} Peeters, {haal weg wat niet tot algoritmisch perspectief behoort} haast zich door {adres thuis, beschrijving in Street View} de donkere gang van {beschrijving door Mechanical Turk} een saai blokjesflatgebouw, ze beweegt zich niet snel genoeg voort om te kunnen zeggen dat ze zich verplaatst met een auto of fiets, en haar hartslag is te laag voor een jogger.”

Tot later in déjà vu

November 30th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

lepromoteur

Het is 30 november, nat en donker. Het KMI geeft 3°C. Buiten troept een zwerm mensen samen op de hoek van het Vossenplein. Waar vanmiddag nog grote collecties snuisterijen waren uitgestald, dansen en drinken ze. Af en toe weerklinkt het refrein van een popsong, omdat ze het luidkeels meezingen. Een jaar nadat mijn roman ‘Tot Later’ verscheen, een verhaal dat zich afspeelt aan een plein dat dreigt te verdwijnen in de handen van een promotor, plakken de protestaffiches massaal op de bomen van het plein hier beneden, dat als sfeervol en tijdloos in alle toeristische gidsen beschreven staat. Aan een jonge linde voor de kerk kan ik nog het silhouet van de promotor onderscheiden. Hij werd er vanmiddag voor een volle markt publiekelijk opgehangen. » Read the rest of this entry «

Revisiting Little Brother: a 1984-spam Vanessa took off his glasses

June 27th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

‘I would have been ten or fifteen pointy little bastards and we held each other and ground my jaws together. “We just drifted apart.” We walked like two people whom he did not seek power for its freedom. If I get a new Middle group splits off from the larynx without involving the higher brain centres at all. Likelier still, nobody knew how we were rubbing our sweaty bodies against each other as long as they parted at the Party is infallible. But since in reality disappeared. Each of the day. Of course. I was going to do so. It was now his diary. And in the future was unimaginable. What certainty had he added half-nostalgically: “‘Oranges and lemons,” say the – Something changed in some connection to this country. But your father is –” She bit into it. Chewed. Swallowed. Gave every impression of having very few words were not continuous. There had been singled out for the counter-attack. Four, five, six – in some way so that his heart a feeling of her t-shirt. Her warm tummy, her soft navel. They inched higher.’

The Python agents’ association called ‘Markmix‘ offer us a version of Doctorow’s Little Brother that brings the novel back in the loop, merging Orwell’s 1984 back into Little Brother. 1984 was a clear inspiration for Doctorow. Many details in the text reveal the source, as f.e.the first nickname of the main character Marcus Yallow. He calls himself w1n5t0n. Pronounced “Winston.”

Brendan Howell wrote a script in which he adapted one of the most used algorithms in our networked society: the Markov chain. » Read the rest of this entry «

1984:revisiting – rights granted!

June 20th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

On Thursday 19th June I received this short message that filled me with joy.

Screenshot from 2014-09-18 12:27:27

From now on, all actions on the text of 1984 will be executed ‘with the permission of AM Heath and the Estate of the late Sonia Brownell Orwell’ and this until June 2016, for sure.

Sonia Brownell Orwell was the last wife of George Orwell. She married him three months before his death. It is said that she ‘was the model for Julia, the heroine of Nineteen Eighty-Four, the “girl from the fiction department” who brings love and warmth to the middle-aged hero, Winston Smith.’ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonia_Orwell). As if the character of the novel became a model for her life, she unfortunately ended up in poverty, ill and miserable in a basement flat in Paris. For more details: https://suite.io/paul-john-ramos/28f32p6

Revisiting Little Brother: the illusion of being unique

May 2nd, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

novel_uniq

The four bash agents, ‘cat’, ‘tr’, ‘sort’ and ‘uniq’ easily collaborate in order to provide us in less than a second with a list of unique words in a text.
Their play allows for different readings. » Read the rest of this entry «

Revisiting Little Brother in sms messages

May 2nd, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

LTTL BRTHR
CHPTR 1

[[THS CHPTR S DDCTD T BKKPHNX BKS N TRNT, CND
[[BKKPHNX BKS: HTTP://WWW

‘M SNR T CSR CHVZ HGH N SN FRNCSC’S SNNY MSSN DSTRCT, ND THT MKS M N F TH MST SRVLLD PPL N TH WRLD

*NT* PRNNCD “DBL-Y-N-NN-FV-T-ZR-NN” — NLSS Y’R CLLSS DSCPLNRY FFCR WH’S FR NGH BHND TH CRV THT Y STLL CLL TH NTRNT “TH NFRMTN SPRHGHWY

KNW JST SCH CLLSS PRSN, ND HS NM S FRD BNSN, N F THR VC-PRNCPLS T CSR CHVZ

“MRCS YLLW,” H SD VR TH P N FRDY MRNNG

GRBBD MY BG ND FLDD MY LPTP THR-QRTRS SHT — DDN’T WNT T BLW MY DWNLDS — ND GT RDY FR TH NVTBL

“RPRT T TH DMNSTRTN FFC MMDTLY

Read more here…
» Read the rest of this entry «

Revisiting Little Brother – the l33t novel

April 18th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

L1ttl3 Br0th3r

1’m 4 s3n10r 4t C3s4r Ch4v3z h1gh 1n S4n Fr4nc1sc0’s sunny M1ss10n d1str1ct, 4nd th4t m4k3s m3 0n3 0f th3 m0st surv31ll3d p30pl3 1n th3 w0rld. My n4m3 1s M4rcus Y4ll0w, but b4ck wh3n th1s st0ry st4rts, 1 w4s g01ng by w1n5t0n. Pr0n0unc3d “W1nst0n.”

Inspired by the gaming culture of Cory Doctorow’s Little Brother, the novel has been rewritten in basic l33t speak by the Bash agent ‘sed’, replacing A by 4, E by 3, I by 1, O by 0.

L33t was invented by hackers in the 80’s to prevent their websites from simple keyword searches. It was widely spread by online gamers afterwards. Phrases such as ‘I am elite’ became common place, and somewhere down the line l33t speak crept in, reforming the phrase into ’1 4m 3l1t3′ in order to demonstrate that the speaker was a hacker and someone to be feared. L33t speak became so succesfull that the use of it now is cliché.

Our Bash agent seems to confirm the cliché: it only takes a oneliner of less than 50 characters to turn an entire novel into the perfectly legible retro-language, and this, in less than a second. As a reader it raises a question to ex-users of L33t: could the experience of reading the novel in the different degrees of l33t-complexity be compared to reading it in Old English, in Shakespeare’s Early Modern English or in Chaucer’s Middle English?

The oneliner:

$ cat Cory_Doctorow_-_Little_Brother.txt | sed ‘s/[aA]/4/g ; s/[eE]/3/g ; s/[Ii]/1/g ; s/[oO]/0/g’ > novel.txt

Read more about this project: 1984 Little Brother Git
You find more versions of the novel on this blog and on gitorious.